Immigration Fees in Mexico 2022

If you are applying to become a resident in Mexico, there are specific immigration fees you should be aware of. These usually increase each year, and are different based on which residency visa or immigration process you will be applying for.

Visitor Visa (tourist)

When you travel to Mexico as a tourist you will either drive across the border, fly in, or take a cruise. And in case you didn’t know this, there is a fee that Mexico charges foreigners to process their FMM or forma migratoria multiple. Which is essentially your tourist visa.

The cost of this is $638 MXN (about $32 USD)

If you are driving across, you can pay for your FMM at the INM offices on the land borders. Although if you are traveling to Mexico for less than 72 hours, there is no charge.

If you are flying to Mexico, the airline automatically charges you this amount when you reserve and pay for your ticket. No need to pay for this again. If you are not a foreigner, you can apply for a refund. But in my experience getting a refund is a marathon.

And if you are taking a cruise to Mexico, the cruise line automatically charges their passengers for this permit to enter Mexico. Although you aren’t given an FMM as you’d normally get if you were flying or driving to Mexico.

Temporary Residents (Canje)

The first part of your residency process will almost always start in your home country. You have to secure a Mexican consulate appointment- where they will check to see if you qualify for residency in Mexico. The cost of this consular appointment is always $48 USD or the equivalent based on your home country’s currency. And it is non-refundable regardless of whether you are approved or not.

The second part of the process takes place in Mexico and is known as CANJE.

Because most Temporary Residents are given their residency card for one year initially, you can expect the cost of this to be $4,739 MXN (about $236 USD).

After the first year you will have to renew your residency visa and can only do so for up to 4 years. These are the costs for renewal

Work Permit for Temporary Residents

If you wish to work in Mexico as a temporary resident, you have to obtain permission to work from INM. Even if you are renting an Airbnb in Mexico as a temporary resident, you have to ask INM for permission to work- because you are generating an income.

The cost of this work permit is $3,558 MXN (about $178 USD)

Permanent Residents are given permission to work without having to process any additional permits., Although you are supposed to notify INM of your intent to work and what you plan to do for work.

Permanent Residents

If you are given permanent residency at the Mexican Consulate that approved your residency, your visa is indefinite and does not need to be renewed. Which means you only pay $5776 MXN once (about $288 USD).

You pay this amount when you come to Mexico to finish your process at the INM offices.

Temporary Residents Changing to Permanent Residency

After 4 years as a Temporary Resident you have the option to become a permanent resident. The process is very straightforward and needs to be done in Mexico.

The cost of this change in your residency status is $1514 MXN (About $76 USD)

Exit and Re-Entry Permit

Any new resident of Mexico who is coming to process their canje (the exchange of their residency stamp for a residency card) CANNOT leave Mexico without written permission from INM. Doing so will cancel your residency process and you will have to start over again.

For this, INM has a special exit and re-entry permit that is given to people in special circumstances. With this permit you are allowed to leave Mexico for a period of up to 60 days. At which point you have to come back to Mexico and cannot leave again until you have your residency card in hand.

The cost of this permit is $484 MXN (about $24 USD)

Who Can Help You With Obtaining Residency in Mexico?

Mexican bureaucracy can be challenging and time consuming. Especially for anyone who has never had to deal with immigration in Mexico.

And although it isn’t impossible to process your residency on your own, the process can be frustrating and confusing. So who can help you ensure you have a smoother experience?

An immigration facilitator.

However, keep in mind that an immigration facilitator’s fees as different than immigration fees. And you can expect to pay an immigration facilitator anywhere from $3,000-$10,000 MXN. Depending on who you hire, what services they offer, how much they will do for you or expect you to do on your own, how many people in your family they are helping, and a few other factors.

A good and reputable immigration facilitator can help guide you through the residency process in Mexico. And because the process varies slightly from one INM office to another in Mexico, it’s important to hire a facilitator that is familiar with local norms.

Hiring a local expert that knows the immigration processes will not only save you time, but it can save you money. Not to mention saving you some frustrations.

Because of this, I have put together a directory of my recommended immigration facilitators across Mexico. I have them in a variety of cities in different states of Mexico. If you’d like one of our recommendations, check out our COMPLETE Mexico Relocation Guide.

Mariana Lange

Mariana Lima-Lange was born in Mexico and immigrated to the U.S. when she was a child. She spent every summer visiting family throughout Mexico and is very knowledgeable about Mexican culture, lifestyle, and traditions. She is fluent in both Spanish and English.

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Maria Wagner says

    When you come to Mexico to complete canje, how many days does that usually take? Days, weeks, months??

    • Mariana Lange says

      Hi Maria
      It fully depends on which INM office you go to
      Some offices can process you in 1 day, some offices take up to 4 weeks

      Mariana

  2. Tony says

    Hi Mariana,

    Great information. I have two questions:

    1- Typically, how long does it take to get the residence card in Mexico and it it different for permanent vs temporary?

    2- Once one has the residence card, does he have to live in mexico or can come maybe once a yeaar to visit?

    3- what are the good immersion Spanish schools in mexico (Potentially near beach areas)?

    Thank you for your help

    • Mariana Lange says

      Hi Tony
      1- the timeframe to get your residency card fully varies on which consulate you start the process in, and which office in Mexico you finish the process in. Assuming you get your appointment at a Mexican consulate rather fast, you will have to travel to Mexico. At which point (and depending on which INM office you go to) it can take from 1 day and up to 4 weeks for you to get your card.
      2-You don’t have to live in Mexico full time. But if you have a temporary residency you do have to come back to Mexico to renew it in person before it expires
      3-The ones I know of are Zaloa languages and in Oaxaca- so not near the beach

  3. Ester says

    Good morning Mariana,

    My best friend just purchased your relocation guide as we plan to move and retire from the US to Mexico in 2025, it’s just invaluable so we appreciate all your efforts and dedication!

    My questions pertain to importing a car. I have a 2018 Rav4 that I would like to be able to import. There will not be a lien on the vehicle after 2025. If I understand correctly I can have it there while I have a temporary visa, correct?

    If I obtain a temporary visa for 4 years in 2025, it would be over 10 years old when I look to become a permanent resident.

    I’m asking for some general information about if this would work as a viable plan, rough cost of any fees, etc. I believe I read something about the car needs to be manufactured in the US or possibly Mexico, how do I find out if my car was made here in the US?

    Of course I know fees increase annually but just helps now to at least have a base to work from if my vehicle falls into the import criteria.

    Thank you!

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